38th World Championship

A report on the U.S. Team's performance at the International Shooting Union matches in Cairo

A well-balanced, superbly coached squad represented the United States at the 38th World Shooting Championships, 10-20 October, 1962, in Cairo, Egypt, United Arab Republic. From the first day of the matches it was evident to all the experts that the United States had produced outstanding marksmen who would be hard to beat - certainly by far the best International Shooting Squad fielded by the United States since the close of World War II.

In 13 team events there were 39 gold, silver and bronze medals awarded by the International Shooting Union. The United States and U.S.S.R. each won 11 medals and 41 other nations won 17 medals.

The difference in value normally attached to gold, silver and bronze medals, loses much of its significance and importance in competition where scores are as closely related as they are in International World Championships. These matches attract the finest shooters in the world and as a result the gold medal winners are often decided by numerical tie breaking procedures. The difference in ability of the first three winners is often very small. Many nations had fine marksmen at Cairo who had superior talent and who did an excellent job for their countries on the basis of comparative scores.

In writing an "after-action" report, the question of greatest importance to us is why the U.S. failed to defeat the U.S.S.R. in eight of the four-man team events.

While it is not my intent to detract in any way from the fine performance of the U.S.S.R. squad, nevertheless had our squad not been plagued by illness so that key shooters could have performed equal to their proven averages at critical times, the results would certainly have been far different. As it was, the final bulletins do not present a clear indication of how close the matches were or of the relative ability of the individual shooters. In fairness it must be stated that we could not ascertain the extent to which certain other nations may have been affected by illness. In reporting the matches as I saw them, I know that our best shooters were ill at the juncture of matches when they were most needed. For example, one of our best shooters, who tied for first place in the Army Rifle competition, was ill on one important day in the 300 meter competition and his score reduced our team average below the winner. In the pistol events, the same thing happened to three of our very best shooters - on one particular day in the center-fire, free pistol and silhouette pistol events. These were not isolated cases, but indicate a situation which continued throughout the course of the matches and affected almost all the shooters on our squad during several days when their average scores would have given us enough to win the team matches. In many instances our shooters were not in physical condition to shoot, but came to the range to compete in spite of their illness, in a very weakened condition. An examination of the scores indicates that most matches were lost by very narrow margins and that the caliber of our efforts over all was of the highest order. I do not believe in alibis, but I am constrained to report the facts as I see them. The U.S. Squad had the potential to win a majority of team events on the basis of the ability of our shooters. We came within an ace of doing so in Cairo.

The rifle events have been considered by all nations as being the paramount competitions in World Championship Matches and it is here that the U.S. individual shooters were clearly and unequivocally outstanding. It was the first time in many years the U.S.S.R. individual shooters did not win a majority of the matches in rifle competitions.

I would like to pay special tribute to our wonderful skeet team which won the skeet team competition and set a new world record in doing so.

In addition, we produced the great individual Champion of the matches, Gary L. Anderson, of Axtell, Nebraska, who took four individual world championships in the rifle events, setting new world records in three out of four of the events which he captured. He proved himself a real champion in rifle marksmanship by winning two small bore events at 50 meters and two free rifle events at 300 meters. Gary, who is studying for the Presbyterian ministry, was calm beyond belief in the grueling matches, one of which lasted for 6½ hours. To indicate the importance of this feat, it must be emphasized that only one other individual at Cairo set a new world record, although the finest shooters in the world from forty-three nations were competing. The pressure on the individual shooter in this type of match competition is terrific. Especially is this true because each shot fired is posted immediately behind the shooter on the firing line for all to see as the match moves forward. Thus the crowds of spectators follow the progress of the best shooters and the psychological effect on the individual shooter is most pronounced. The tensions thus built up have destroyed many a potential world record. In the case of Gary Anderson, it brought out his best. He would relax after a shot and often turned around and smiled at the crowd in a manner which seemed most unconcerned. Those of us who knew him best realized he was calling on hidden reserves of mental, moral and physical power, but this certainly was not visible to the casual observer. Gary has come a long way. He has developed steadily over the past several years. He was brought to Rome for the Olympic Games as a substitute on the rifle team, but did not fire in the competitions. He came to Cairo as an unknown and left as the hero of the 38th World Championship Matches. He represents the best traditions of American sportsmanship.

The Ladies' Events were considered special events at the World Championships and were not authorized for establishment of world records and must therefore be considered separately. We were proud of the shooting of our ladies who were second in trap, skeet, and center-fire pistol, third in silhouette rapid fire pistol and fifth in the small bore rifle match.

Mr. John Lovesey, London correspondent of Sports Illustrated, in an article in the October 29 issue, quoted me as being disappointed in the results. This is true, but he failed to explain that my disappointment was due only to the fact that we had a squad that I was proud of and I knew could win if we had reasonable luck. The fact that we did not win the majority of team events, because of physical reasons, does not detract from my great admiration for each of the team members. They did all in their power to win and our hats should be off to them.

While we all know that since 1954 the Russians have clearly dominated the International shooting picture, we trained and selected a team to go to Cairo which, on paper, clearly had the ability to win in all events. That they were unable to do so was in my opinion due largely to circumstances over which they had not control. I predict we will break through in the near future, providing we continue to apply ourselves diligently to the problem. No one in the world, including the Russians, could beat us in the American type of rifle and pistol competition we conduct at Camp Perry. International type competition has been slow to take hold in the United States. It is an entirely different game, but we are mastering it and will win a majority of all events in due time. Cairo presents an excellent point of departure, for our improvement in comparison with all other World Championship matches since World War II is dramatic indeed. - Franklin L. Orth, Executive Vice President, NRA.

American Rifleman, Vol. 110, No. 12, December 1962

Team Photo

1962 U.S. International Team

Rifle Members

Sgt. Gary L. Anderson, USAR; Lt. John T. Bertva, USAF; G/Sgt. James E. Hill, USMC; Lt. Presley W. Kendall, USAR; Capt. Tommy G. Pool, USA; Capt. Daniel B. Puckel, USA and Capt. Verle F. Wright, Jr., USA

Pistol Members

SFC W. B. Blankenship, Jr., USA; SFC Lloyd Burchett, USA; Capt. Frenklin C. Green, USAF; Capt. W. W. McMillan, Jr., USMC; S/Sgt. James H. McNally, USA; M/Sgt. Fred G. Schasser, USA; SFC Aubrey E. Smith, USA and Capt. Cecil L. Wallis, USA

Clay Pigeon Members

Lt. William A. Brauer, USA; M/Sgt. David R. Dunsmoor, USA; Sgt./Maj. Harold Grewe, USA and Lt. Gordon B. Horner, USA

Skeet Members

Edwin C. L. Calhoun; A/2C Thomas J. Heffron, USAF; CPO Kenneth L. Pendergras, USN and Robert D. Rodale

Running Deer Members

Lt. John R. Foster, USAR; Lt. Willis L. Powell, USA; Sgt. Norman L. Skarpness, USA; Lt. John W. Torbush, USA and SFC Loyd G. Crow, USA (Alternate)

Women Shooters

Marjorie Annan (Skeet); Charlotte Berkenkamp (Trap); Janet S. Friddell (Smallbore Rifle); Marianne M. Jensen (Smallbore Rifle); Lt. Gail N. Liberty, USAF (Pistol); Gertrude Schlernitzauer (Pistol) and Marianne Driver (Offical)

Team Management & Support

Franklin L. Orth, NRA Executive Vice President, Head of U.S. Delegation; Maj. Gen. Earle J. Jones, Chairman, NRA International Shooting Committe, Delegate to ISU General Assembly; Col. Thomas J. Sharpe, USA, Team Captain and Otto A. Finley, NRA Staff, Team Adjutant and M/Sgt. Jack L. Click, USA, Armorer

ISU Officials: Juryman & Referees (U.S. Representatives)

Classing Committee: Col. Perry D. Swindler, USA (Ret'd) and M/Sgt. Jack Beach, USA

300-Meter Free-Rifle: Col. Sidney C. Carpenter, USA

50-Meter Smallbore Rifle: Carl E. Kastner

Pistol: Col. Walter R. Walsh, USMC

Running Deer: Lt. Col. William Brophy, USA

Trap & Skeet: Lt. Col. Michael Tipa, USA

At Cairo, Egypt

U.S. Sends Strong Team to World Shoot-Off

Spt. Ron Claxton

Representing a history of excellence, 34 U.S. marksmen departed Fort Benning Sunday for Cairo, Egypt, where they will pit their marksmanship proficiency against representatives from some 50 countries in the 1962 World Championships Tuesday through Oct. 20.

These modern-day Sgt. Alvin Yorks and Annie Oakleys have been practicing on The Infantry's Center complete complex of International — type ranges since the close of the U.S. tryouts.

The United States has long been credited with being "a nation of rifleman."

Born of necessity, with large numbers of Americans living on the frontier of our nation's continental expansion, this skill was a provider and a defense. It was long a part of our military potential, and the history of the military is filled with heroic accomplishments of American riflemen.

In 1903, the year of the first National Rifle and Pistol Matches through which U.S. National Guard units romped the regular services, through a realization of marksmanship deficiency, turned to the Guardsmen for help. With this help, improvement came rapidly. Soon the regulars were winning in national matches.

Then in answer to the Soviet challenge flung about 1955, America decided that her marksmen and armorers could and would meet that if the opportunity was provided.

This meant U.S. marksmen would have to learn a type of shooting far different from what they were used to.

"In ordinary competition shooters compete among themselves, but in this International-type shooting the competitor fights his greatest battle with himself," MSgt. (Ret.) Charles A. Quinn, an old pro said.

For example, Sgt. Quinn added riflemen shooting in the Free Rifle Match at 300 meters would be permitted six hourse to complete 120 shots from three positions.

"In this match," he said, "they'll attempt to put 120 shots into a circle no larger than the top of a teacup at a range of some 327 yards."

He described weapons to be used a finely machined instruments which might weigh as much as 17½ pounds. The marksman added that handling this dead weight for six hours at a stretch was a mean task in itself.

Once the firer begins his score, Quinn states, he must call on his utmost concentration, muscular and nerve coordination, mental sharpness and eyesight to get that first shot exactly where he wants it.

According to the sergeant, the 300-meter match calls for 40 shots each in the prone, kneeling and standing positions. The physical and mental requirements can only be appreciated by the competitors themselves, he added.

With the end of the 1962 U.S. International Shooting Trials held jointly at Fort Benning and Lackland Air Force Base, Tex., the United States has come up with the strongest them since World War II, U.S. team captain Col. Thomas A. Sharpe, assistant chief of the Training Division, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations, Department of the Army, Washington, D.C., said.

"The United States finished second in the 1958 World shoot held in Moscow," Col. Sharpe pointed out. but in team trials this year team members have exceeded the world records in all except two events with one of these being a tie."

The 34 representatives from the United States will include 1st Lt. Willis L. Powell, world Running Deer double runs champion, and SFC Loyd G. Crow, Jr., world single run champ, in the Running Deer tilts.

On the pistol scene Army SFC William B. Blankenship, champion; Air Force Capt. Franklin C. Green, national International-type free pistol champion; Army Capt. Cecil L. Wallis, 1962 Armed Forces International rapid fire pistol champion, and Marine Corps Capt. William W. McMillan, Jr., world and Olympic rapid fire pistol champion, will pit their prowess against the world's best.

Army 1st Lt. Gordon B. Horner, 1956 world American skeet champion, is a heavy favorite in the skeet shoot.

Janet S. Friddell will represent the United States in the women's smallbore rifle events. Miss Friddell was women's smallbore rifle champ this year at the National Matches at Camp Perry, Ohio.

Women's Air Force 1st Lt. Gail N. Liberty, women's national pistol champion at Camp Perry, and Trudy Schlernetzauer, runner-up to Lt. Liberty and Camp Perry .22 caliber pistol champion, promise strong competition in the women's International center fire pistol events.

With this array of talent the United States promises to be formidable contender to previous Russian supremacy in the World shoots.

The Bayonet, Friday, October 5, 1962

Sportsmen's Roundup

CAIRO (AP) - Seven hundred legal gunmen from around the world are now banging away in the shadow of the Pyramids and shooting it out in the biggest world powder-and-ball championships ever held.

Regular tourists in Cairo are carrying rifles and trooping out to the ranges near the Pyramids. The championship meeting of 44 countries got started Thursday with formal ceremonies. The events began Friday.

For marksmen, the world shooting championships, held every four years, are equivalent to the World Cup Soccer, the World Series and the Olympics rolled into one.

They attack their targets with odd-shaped pistols and rifles which would make a quick-draw Western sheriff turn over in his grave - though he probably couldn't come close to their precision.

Russian marksmen are again favored to walk off with most of the team titles - as they have done at every meeting since World War II - but there are literally dozens of possible individual champions.

"This is the biggest championship ever held," said Edgar Zimmermann (Switzerland), secretary general of the International Shooting Union. "With so many expert shooters from so many countries it is impossible to predict the outcome of individual events."

There will be 16 men's titles and six for women in rifle, pistol, skeet and clay pigeon events - with team championships in all events.

Most entrants are military men but the teams also include such varied members as Indian Maharajah Karnisinghji of Bokaner; Japanese judo expert Kozo Takizawa; Maryland chicken farmer Edwin Calhoun British innkeeper Jessie Wilson and a Soviet spot-welder name Nikitim.

Youngest competitor is blond, 18-year-old Marianne Jenson, Detroit Mich., who is favored in the women's rifle competition despite her youth.

In an evident effort to outshoot the Russians, who staged the 1958 championships, the Egyptians have built a shiny new rifle and pistol range at the edge of the desert which Army Lt John Foster, Springfield, Ohio, calls "Far better than anything anyone else had put up anywhere."

One minor trouble was that the running deer - a gadget like a mechanical rabbit at a dog track - ran two seconds too slow. It was hoped to get the deer on time for that event.

Col Thomas Sharp, U.S. team captain, said: "This is the best team the United States has ever entered, and we are not conceding anything in advance. We didn't fill out the team just to have entries in every event. We have good people in every event."

Many other contestants also are strong contenders for individual titles, including Stig Berstsson (Sweden), rapid-fire pistol; A. J. Chivers (Britain), free pistol; Pauli Janhonen (Finland), free rifle, and Jorma Taitt (Finland), free rifle.

Nations entered are: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burma, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, East Germany, Finland, France, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, India, Italy, Japan, Indonsia, Kenya, Lebanon, Monaco, the Netherlands, North Korea, Norway, the Philippines, Poland, Puerto Rico, Portugal, Romania, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the U.S., Russia, Venezuela, West Germany, Yugoslavia and Egypt.

Stars & Stripes, October 13, 1962

Shooting

CAIRO, U.A.R. (UPI) - The Soviet Union set a world record of 2,348 points in winning the two day center fire pistol event at the world shooting championships. The record bettered the 2,337 points posted by the United States.

Top scorers from the United States were William B. Blankenship, Jr., who was third with 588 points, William McMillan, fifth with 587 points and Frank C. Green, sixth with 586.

San Antonio Light, October 14, 1962

Russian, American Teams Still 1 and 2 At World Championship Shoot in Cairo

CAIRO (AP) - The Soviet Union won the single shot running deer competition Wednesday in the 38th World Shooting Championships underway here.

The Russian four-man team scored 879 out of a possible 1,000 points. The United States placed second with 867; Sweden third with 842 and Finland fourth with 824.

Only five teams entered the event and Egypt finished last with 625. Oleg Zacourenev, Russia, won the individual event with a close victory over U.S. and Swedish shooters.

Zacourenev scored 229; U.S. Army Lt John Foster, of Springfield, Ohio, 229; and third was Hjalmar Floodman, Sweden, 227.

In the running deer competition the shooters fire at a deer silhouette speeding across the range 100 meters from their firing stand.

Vladmir Stojypineo, Russia, won the 50-meter free pistol event with 559. Second was Japanese police sergeant Yoshihisa Yoshikawa with 557, third was Ludwig Hemauer, Switzerland, 550; Fourth U.S. Army MSgt Fred Schaser, Vineland, N.J., 548; fifth, Mijhall Akoulov, Russian, 454; sixth, Grigori Kossykh, Russian, 544; seventh, Lloyd Burchett, Carrollton, Miss., U.S.A., 544.

Russian won the team title with 2189; the United States second, 2169; and Switzerland, third, 2151.

On Sunday, the Soviet Union won the world championship and first two places in three position small-bore rifle competition for women.

Kira Dolgoborodova of Russia scored 864 to win the world championship.

Elen Donskai of Russia was second with 853, third Renate Wischnewski of East Germany, 824.

During weekend firing, the U.S. team won the world skeet shooting championship missing only six out of 400 shots.

Although other teams were still shooting when the United States finished, their score of 394 could not be topped by either Russia or Sweden fighting for second place.

The United States team scored with each man firing 100 birds; Navy CPO Kenneth Pendergras, Jacksonville, Fla., 99; Edwin Calhoun, 98, Salisbury, Md.; Thomas Heffron, Groton, N.Y., 98; Robert Rodale, Allentown, Pa., 99.

Although the U.S. took top team honors, Nikolai Dournev, of Russia, won the world's individual skeet championship with a perfect world record of 200 birds.

The previous record, 199, was held by Carlos Plaza, Venezuela, who is not competing in this year's world shooting championships.

Yurii Tsuranov, Russian, won second place in the individual skeet with 198 birds.

Two United States shooters won third and fourth places in the individual skeet finals with a tie score of 197 birds. Heffron placed third and Pendergras fourth.

According to regulations they should re-shoot for standings, but both shooters refused and suggested a flip. The federation refused and insisted on a shoot off.

Pendergras declined, thus giving third place to Heffron.

Stars & Stripes, October 17, 1962

2 Team Titles Taken By Shooters in Cairo

The United States has won two team championships at the 38th World Championships underway at Cairo, United Arab Republic.

The American marksmen captured the world skeet crown with a record-smashing 394 out of 400 birds and the Smallbore Rifle Standing Match with a score of 1,464 a single point below the world mark.

In the latter event Sgt. Gary L. Anderson, an Army Reservist on active duty with the Marksmanship Training Unit here, established a new world mark for individual firing with a 376 x 400 point to win the match.

Capt. Tommy Pool, MTU, placed third behind Voot of Switzerland with 366.

In two other completed team events the United States placed second.

The Americans finished one point behind the winning Swedish team in the 60-shot Smallbore Rifle Olympic Match, 2,354 to 2,355.

They were runner-up to the Russians in the Center Fire Team Match, 2,341 to 2,349.

In the Smallbore Rifle Olympic Match, WO James Hill, U.S. Marine Corps, placed third, and Sgt. Anderson, sixth, with scores of 592 and 590. The match was won by Wenk of West Germany with a 594 score.

The best American effort in the women's category was made by teenager Marianne Jensen, a 17-year-old from Allen Park, Mich., who finished fifth with a 579, seven points behind the winner.

The Bayonet, Friday, October 26, 1962

Egyptian Newspaper

News Article
25 Meter Rapid-Fire Pistol
Individual Scores
Rank Name Country Total Points
1 Alexander Zabelin U.S.S.R. 589
2 Igor Rakalov U.S.S.R. 588
3 James McNally U.S.A. 588
6 Cecil Wallis U.S.A. 585
16 William McMillan U.S.A. 579
22 Aubrey Smith U.S.A. 575

(Source: ISSF & U.S.A. Shooting Results)


25 Meter Rapid-Fire Pistol
Team Scores
Rank Country Total Points
1 U.S.S.R. 2333
2 United States 2327
3 Italy 2312
4 Hungary 2309
5 Czechoslovakia 2307

(Source: ISSF Results)


U.S.S.R. Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2333

(Source: ISSF Results)


United States Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 James McNally - 588
2 Cecil Wallis - 585
3 William McMillan - 579
4 Aubrey Smith - 575
Team Total: 2327

(Source: ISSF Results)


Italy Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2312

(Source: ISSF Results)


Hungary Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2309

(Source: ISSF Results)


Czechoslovakia Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2307

(Source: ISSF Results)


25 Meter Center-Fire Pistol
Individual Scores
Rank Name Country Total Points
1 Igor Rakalov U.S.S.R. 590
2 Yevgeny Haydurov U.S.S.R. 589
3 William Blankenship U.S.A. 588
5 William McMillan U.S.A. 587
6 Franklin Green U.S.A. 586
17 Cecil Wallis U.S.A. 580

(Source: ISSF & U.S.A. Shooting Results)


25 Meter Center-Fire Pistol
Team Scores
Rank Country Total Points
1 U.S.S.R. 2349
2 United States 2341
3 East Germany 2314

(Source: ISSF Results)


U.S.S.R. Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2349

(Source: ISSF Results)


United States Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 William Blankenship - 588
2 William McMillan - 587
3 Franklin Green - 586
4 Cecil Wallis - 580
Team Total: 2341

(Source: ISSF Results)


East Germany Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2314

(Source: ISSF Results)


Switzerland Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2313

(Source: ISSF Results)


Czechoslovakia Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2305

(Source: ISSF Results)



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